Friday, May 25, 2007

1. RRW: HOUSE APPROPRIATIONS SUBCOMMITTEE NUKES NEW WARHEAD.

The administration broke a leg coming out of the starting gate this week when a House panel eliminated funding for the Reliable Replacement Warhead. First, the administration declined to ratify the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty, and now proposes to develop a whole new generation of nuclear weapons, while at the same telling other nations not to develop them. That might rank among the most dangerous strategies in history unless the United States has an impenetrable shield against attack. Let's take a look at how that's coming.

2. MISSILE DEFENSE: CONGRESS IS THREATENING TO NUKE THAT TOO.

A lot depends on a test of the antimissile shield in California and Alaska scheduled for this week. The shield hasn't been exactly impenetrable in previous tests, though it's alleged to have hit the target once in a highly choreographed test. In Texas they say, "Even a blind sow will pick up an acorn occasionally." Fred Lamb, a physics professor at the University of Illinois, who recently led a study of missile defense for the American Physical Society, is concerned that the new test might be another acorn. He is quoted in the New York Times as worrying that a successful test would be cited as proof that "the system has a substantial capability in a real battle situation. That would be a gross exaggeration."

3. CREATION: VEGETARIAN DINOSAURS LINE UP TO BOARD NOAH'S ARK.

Jurassic Park it's not. The $27M Creation Museum in Petersburg, KY opens Monday. Petersburg is across the Ohio River from Cincinnati, but it's about 150 years behind. I was in Cincinnati for a meeting a number of years ago. It was a bright spring day, and I took the lunch period to walk in a pleasant park that ran a mile or so along the bank above the river. There were bronze plaques set in the walkway depicting long- extinct life forms characteristic of each geologic period. As they walked further and further back in time, children would stop to read each one. Across the river, the Creation Museum shows the world after "the fall" and expulsion from Eden. Frozen in time, dinosaurs and people were created on the sixth day, and never ate each other. The museum is a monument to the failure of education. Meanwhile, the National Association of State Boards of Education will elect officers in July. There is only one candidate for President-elect: Kenneth Wilson, a Kansas Republican who voted to change the state's science standards to include intelligent design.

Bob Park can be reached via email at whatsnew@bobpark.org
THE UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
Opinions are the author's and are not necessarily shared by the University, but they should be.